Value Based Agreement Oncology

Cancer practices willing to discuss value-based agreements with paying agencies must be prepared to address these three cost factors. For doctors and payers, the influx of innovative therapies, especially immunotherapies and the resulting requirement to test for genetic markers, increases the cost and complexity of treating patients for different types of cancer. It should therefore come as no surprise that paying agencies are increasingly limiting the approval of expensive drugs to the FDA label, thus limiting off-label use. The value-base contract, which links reimbursement to short- and long-term efficacy, offers a unique opportunity to participate in the savings from the use of drugs on the label and expand access to innovative therapies for the right patients at the right time. Gamble asked the group if it would be easier to enter into value-based agreements with the payer and the supplier, in combination or only with the supplier. Building agreements around the quality measures that community oncologists already collect every day is helpful, and reimbursement can follow, Ditarts said. Dr. Jeffrey Scott is Chief Medical Officer at Integra Connect, where he oversees the development of all clinical products, content and services and enables community-based oncology practices to maximize the value of care. These innovative arrangements are best suited for therapies where patient populations and clinical criteria are well defined, such as for example. B in oncology, for which therapies have clear and measurable results in the short and long term. The New Era of Drug Pricing: Value-Driven Contract The success of value-based reimbursement models requires oncologists to provide quality, patient-centered care while achieving significant savings.

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